This Week in Police Violence
centerforinvestigativereporting:

Police in Los Angeles tested wide-area surveillance technology on the streets of Compton.
It’s described as “Google Earth with a rewind button and the ability to play back the movement of cars and people.” 
Curious: Does surveillance technology like this make you feel safer? Creeped out?
Gif via Gizmodo

centerforinvestigativereporting:

Police in Los Angeles tested wide-area surveillance technology on the streets of Compton.

It’s described as “Google Earth with a rewind button and the ability to play back the movement of cars and people.” 

Curious: Does surveillance technology like this make you feel safer? Creeped out?

Gif via Gizmodo

centerforinvestigativereporting:

Police in Los Angeles County recently piloted a new technology known as wide-area surveillance to monitor Compton’s streets from the air. Imagine Google Earth with a rewind button for law enforcement.So why have local residents heard little about this experiment until now?Our new special with KQED gives you a first-hand look at emerging surveillance technologies that are being used to fight crime – and the privacy concerns they raise.
Read the full story and watch the segment here.

centerforinvestigativereporting:

Police in Los Angeles County recently piloted a new technology known as wide-area surveillance to monitor Compton’s streets from the air. Imagine Google Earth with a rewind button for law enforcement.

So why have local residents heard little about this experiment until now?

Our new special with KQED gives you a first-hand look at emerging surveillance technologies that are being used to fight crime – and the privacy concerns they raise.

Read the full story and watch the segment here.

There are very, very few African-American astrophysics PhDs. That’s for a reason. I was doing something people of my skin color were not supposed to do.

I was stopped and questioned seven times by University police on my way into the physics building,” he explained. “Seven times. Zero times was I stopped going into the gym — and I went to the gym a lot. That says all you need to know about how welcome I felt at Texas.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson, an anomaly in American science

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(via policymic)

Perhaps in the 1980s the intent was to secretly infiltrate radical movements unbeknownst to the participants, yet in later decades when knowledge of such infiltrations became commonplace, strategy shifted to capitalise on the disruptive effects of presumed surveillance. As it is established that officials were aware of undercover officers forming sexual relationships within target communities, it must be assumed that such actions were understood as aiding their larger goals. It is also entirely possible that the police agencies responsible for dispatching undercover officers became aware that knowledge of their embedded presence would serve to destabilise communities, and thus facilitated (or failed to stop) leaks of information that would lead to such a strategy being exposed. The production of the expectation of surveillance may serve to be a more valuable feature than the actual surveillance, in the same way that the anticipated guillotine serves a more efficient disciplinary power then its public usage.

A hundred drunk white children yelling, “Fuck. Da. Po-lice.”

You can literally make people crazy by keeping them in solitary.

Dr. Bruce Perry, a child psychiatrist and senior fellow at the ChildTrauma Academy in Houston, explains the mental and physical toll that solitary confinement takes on kids.

Learn more in the full Q&A with CIR reporter Trey Bundy here

(via centerforinvestigativereporting)

Jon Stewart and Matt Taibbi discuss the different treatment afforded to ‘street’ based drug users and white-collar criminals profiting from the drug trade.

Drugs Laws + Prison = System of Control for People of Color

lolmythesis:

Latin American Studies, New York University

bobsavage:

nostalgic69:

damn ABQ
none of these photos are mine

ACAB